Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive Review: Is it the Best Indoor Cycle Trainer?

Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive Review: Is it the Best Indoor Cycle Trainer?

If you are looking for a high-quality indoor cycle trainer to give you a challenging and effective workout, you might want to check out the Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive. This bike is designed to deliver a smooth, quiet and consistent ride that mimics the feel of a real road bike.

In this blog post, I will review the features and benefits of the Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive and help you decide if it is the best indoor cycle trainer for you.

What are the Features of the Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive?

The Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive is not your ordinary indoor bike. It has a unique feature that sets it apart from other bikes: the Gates® Carbon Drive™ System.

This system uses a carbon fiber belt instead of a chain to transfer power from the pedals to the flywheel. This means that the bike is virtually maintenance-free, as there is no need to lubricate, adjust or replace the chain. The belt also reduces noise and vibration, making the ride smoother and quieter.

Another advantage of the Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive is its magnetic resistance system. Unlike conventional friction-based systems that use brake pads to create resistance, the magnetic system uses magnets to generate resistance proportional to the flywheel’s speed. This means that the resistance is more consistent and accurate, and there are no brake pads to wear out or replace. The magnetic system also allows for a wider range of resistance levels, from easy to very hard, to suit different fitness levels and goals.

The Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive has a sturdy and lightweight aluminum frame that is resistant to rust and easy to move around.

The bike has an ergonomic saddle that offers pressure relief and support for comfort and dual-sided pedals that are compatible with both SPD cleats and regular shoes.

The bike also comes with an EKG chest strap that wirelessly sends your heart rate data to the console, so you can monitor your intensity and stay in your target zone.

The Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive has a large flywheel that weighs 48 lbs and has a perimeter-weighted design. This design adds to the bike’s high-inertia system, which creates a smooth ride experience that simulates the feel of a real road bike.

The flywheel also helps generate more resistance as you pedal faster, creating a high-intensity interval training (HIIT) workout that burns more calories and builds muscle.

The Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive is a data-driven bike that can help you improve your fitness and performance. The console displays your speed, distance, time, calories, RPM, watts and heart rate so you can track your progress and adjust your workout accordingly.

The console also has a USB port that allows you to connect your device and access various apps and programs to enhance your training experience.

Freemotion S11.9 Spin Bike Alternatives

The Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive is a great indoor cycle trainer, but it is not the only one on the market. Other bikes can offer similar or different features and benefits, depending on your preferences and budget.

Peloton Bike+

This spin bike is popular among indoor cycling enthusiasts, as it offers a live and interactive training experience. However, this bike is also one of the most expensive options, costing around $2,500, plus a monthly subscription fee of $39 for unlimited access to the classes and content. If you are looking for a budget-friendly option, this might not be your best choice.

NordicTrack Commercial S22i Studio Cycle

This bike is similar to the Peloton Bike+, offering a live and interactive training experience. However, this bike is also expensive, costing around $2,000, plus a yearly subscription fee of $396 for unlimited access to the classes and content.

Keiser M3i Indoor Cycle

This indoor bike differs from the previous two bikes as it does not have a touchscreen or streaming capabilities. Instead, it focuses on providing a simple and reliable ride that mimics the feel of a real road bike. This bike is also expensive, costing around $2,000 for a basic model without a touchscreen or streaming capabilities.

So, what are some of the budget-friendly options that you can consider? Here are some of them:

The Schwinn IC4 Indoor Cycling Bike

This bike costs around $800 and has a belt drive system, a magnetic resistance system, an ergonomic saddle, dual-sided pedals and a heart rate monitor. The bike also has Bluetooth connectivity that lets you sync with various apps and devices, such as Peloton and Zwift.

The Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1805 Indoor Cycle Bike

This bike costs around $600 and has a belt drive system, a magnetic resistance system, an ergonomic saddle, dual-sided pedals and a heart rate monitor. The bike also has an LCD console that displays your speed, distance, time, calories and RPM.

The YOSUDA L-001A Indoor Cycling Bike

This bike costs around $400 and has a belt drive system, a friction-based resistance system, an ergonomic saddle, dual-sided pedals and a heart rate monitor. The bike also has an LCD console that displays your speed, distance, time, calories and odometer.

The Freemotion S11.9 Carbon Drive is one of the best indoor cycle trainers on the market today, but it is not the only one. Depending on your preferences and budget, you might want to consider other options, such as the Peloton Bike+, the NordicTrack Commercial S22i Studio Cycle or the Keiser M3i Indoor Cycle. However, if you are looking for a budget-friendly option. In that case, you might want to consider some of the cheaper alternatives, such as the Schwinn IC4 Indoor Cycling Bike, the Sunny Health & Fitness SF-B1805 Indoor Cycle Bike or the YOSUDA L-001A Indoor Cycling Bike. Each of these bikes has its pros and cons, so you should do your research and compare them before making your final decision.

Adam Johnson

As a middle-aged, 40-something cyclist, my riding goals have changed over the years. A lover of all things retro, and an avid flat bar cyclist, I continue to live off past triathlon glories.

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